THE NATURE RESERVE

Set aside from normal agricultural practices in the year 2000, The “Bosque y Vegetación Protectores Rumi Wilco” represents the most biodiverse section of the inner valley of Vilcabamba. Its smallness (less than 40 hectares) and proximity to the village, makes it particularly valuable in the face of urbanizing forces. Home also to one of the most rare and enigmatic tree species in Ecuador, the Wilco (Anadenanthera colubrina), whose range extends little outside the valley proper.

At present, 141 species of birds have been identified in the nature reserve. We presume the total number has yet not been reached.

 Link to Official Register here

I N V I T A T I O N

To present and future visitors of Vilcabamba


The Rumi Wilco Nature Reserve invites you to do a bit of trekking along its self-guided trail system.

Twelve paths cover most of the reserve, several of which are elevated and overlook the valley. The trails traverse steep slopes, ridges, gullies and floodplain.

 

 

 

 

 

 


A contribution fee of U$D 2  is required which will allow up to three separate visits (bring change for drop-in box).





Photo: Robert Payne

* Much of the native flora here is identified taxonomically (approx. 700 plant species)

* Interpretive signs may be encountered, describing aspects of the area

* Birding is well recommended
   for full listing

Plates of common birds of Rumi Wilco

 

 

 

Photo:Takashiro Shimada


* The Natural Vilcabamba a guide for the naturally curious” booklet can be purchased at the Ecolodge reception.    This guide will give you a better idea of the area’s geology, geography, hydrology, flora and human social issues. It will help you to better understand this Reserve environment as well.

* Open hours are from sunrise to sunset
* We expect visitors not to bring dogs or horses
* Sneak
ers or hiking shoes convenient here

The entrance is located at the end of Agua de Hierro road, crossing the
foot bridge over the Chamba river.
It is approximately a 15-minute walk from the village's center.

 

 






Photo: Rudy Mejia